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CET and HCP guidelines

CET is a well established approach in the treatment of dry skin conditions, specifically eczema, and there is a breadth of evidence and supporting guidelines for CET and emollient use generally.

Continual treatment with Complete Emollient Therapy (combinations of cream, ointment, bath oil and emollient soap substitute) will help provide maximal effect

Guidelines for the management of atopic eczema by Primary Care Dermatology Society and British Association of Dermatologists1

The use of CET is one of the simplest, safest and most effective methods to control atopic eczema and uses emollient cream, ointments, emollient soap substitutes and emollient bath and shower products

Caring for children and young people with atopic eczema by Royal College of Nursing2

Intensive use of emollients will reduce the need for topical steroids. It should be emphasised to all patients that the quantity and frequency of use of emollients should be far greater than that of other therapies they may be given

Guidelines for the management of atopic eczema by Primary Care Dermatology Society and British Association of Dermatologists1

Flares can usually be controlled with emollient and/or topical steroid treatment. Emollients are the mainstay of treatment for mild flares of atopic eczema. They should be prescribed in generous amounts and frequent and liberal use advised, even when the skin is clear.

National Institute of Clinical Excellence Guidance; Eczema – atopic, Revised March 20133

References for quotes:
1 - http://www.pcds.org.uk/images/stories/pcdsbad-eczema.pdf
2 - https://www.rcn.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/156006/003228.pdf
3 - http://cks.nice.org.uk/eczema-atopic#!topicsummary